BOSLEY BOBKINS PRE-SCHOOL

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Bosley Bobkins Pre-School Ofsted Report 2018

 Bosley Bobkins Preschool

St Mary's C of E School, Leek Road, Bosley, Macclesfield, SK11 0NX

Inspection date 26 March 2018

Previous inspection date  16 October 2014



The quality and standards of the early years provision

This inspection: Good 2

Previous inspection: Good 2

Effectiveness of the leadership and management Good 2

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment Good 2

Personal development, behaviour and welfare Good 2

Outcomes for children Good 2

Summary of key findings for parents

This provision is good

 The manager and staff are enthusiastic and have very good collaborative working

partnerships to ensure the pre-school is continually improving. They are committed to

developing the pre-school and successfully identify areas for further improvement.

 Partnerships with parents are effective. Staff keep parents informed about all aspects of

children's care and learning. Staff provide parents with information sheets and

workshops to help support children's learning at home.

 The manager supports staff to develop their skills well by providing relevant training

opportunities. She shares good practice issues with other settings to improve learning

opportunities for children.

 Staff successfully teach children the skills they need for school. Children develop very

good language, numeracy and literacy skills. Staff use skilful ways to challenge

children's thinking and encourage them to solve practical problems.

 Children show a good understanding of the expectations and boundaries set by staff.

They behave well, develop good social skills and independence in their self-care.


It is not yet outstanding because:

 Staff do not focus sharply enough on the information gained from observations and

assessments to prioritise children's next steps in their learning to help them make the

best possible progress.

 Staff do not always organise larger group activities as well as they could, to effectively

engage all children taking part.

Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins Preschool, 26 March 2018 2 of 5

What the setting needs to do to improve further

To further improve the quality of the early years provision the provider should:

 make better use of assessments to plan precise next steps to help children make more

rapid progress in their learning

 review the organisation of group activities that include younger children to take

account of their different abilities, so that all children are fully involved.

Inspection activities

 The inspector observed the quality of teaching during activities indoors and outdoors

and assessed the impact this has on children’s learning

 The inspector completed a joint evaluation of teaching with the manager and assessed

the impact this has on children learning.

 The inspector had discussions with staff and spoke to children and parents during the

inspection.

 The inspector looked at relevant documentation, such as policies and procedures,

children’s records and checked the evidence of the suitability of staff.

 The inspector held a meeting with the manager.

Inspector

Susan Rogers

Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins Preschool, 26 March 2018 3 of 5

Inspection findings

Effectiveness of the leadership and management is good

Safeguarding is effective. All staff have completed up-to-date safeguarding training. They

have a clear understanding of how to respond to any concerns about a child's welfare.

This helps to keep children safe. Leaders and staff work effectively with parents and other

agencies to help children who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities

make progress. Staff develop successful partnerships with schools that children move on

to. They plan regular visits and share information with children's new schools. Children are

well prepared for this transition and staff help teachers to support children right from the

start. Parents and children's views are valued and used to prioritise future improvement

plans in the pre-school.

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment is good

Well-qualified staff understand how young children learn. Staff interact in positive ways

and promote interesting activities that encourage children's natural curiosity. Staff

motivate children's learning and support their development well. Children thoroughly enjoy

the activities the staff provide. For example, they explore the texture of paint and make

artistic shapes with their hand prints. Staff discuss with children which colours they make

when they mix paint together. Staff support children well as they make Easter nest cakes.

Children work well together and calculate how many cases they will need for the number

of children. They estimate that the chocolate takes a short time to melt rather than a long

time. Children talk with confidence and discuss the changes that take place after the

chocolate melts. They competently scoop the mixture into cases using spoons.

Personal development, behaviour and welfare are good

Staff are very good role models for children and teach them how to be kind and

respectful. Children are supported well as they as they start at the pre-school and transfer

to school. For example, some children enjoy a school or packed lunch in the dining hall of

the host school, which promotes their confidence in new surroundings. Children develop

good self-help skills and wash their hands before they enjoy a snack of fresh fruit.

Children enjoy energetic play outdoors and take managed risks that support their physical

development. They learn about and explore the natural world around them. For example,

they walk to the local church and village and explore the nearby fields where they discover

insects and small animals.

Outcomes for children are good

All children make good progress from their starting points. They confidently communicate

their needs and ideas. Children are keen, enthusiastic learners. Older children show

particularly good skills in their literacy and independence. Children are working in the

stages typically expected for their age and are well prepared for the next stage in their

learning and their eventual move on to school.

 

Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins Preschool, 26 March 2018 4 of 5

Setting details

Unique reference number 304986

Local authority Cheshire East

Inspection number 1103485

Type of provision Sessional provision

Day care type Childcare - Non-Domestic

Registers Early Years Register, Compulsory Childcare

Register, Voluntary Childcare Register

Age range of children 2 - 4

Total number of places 16

Number of children on roll 16

Name of registered person Bosley Bobkins Pre School Committee

Registered person unique

reference number

RP909088

Date of previous inspection 16 October 2014

Telephone number 01260 222993

Bosley Bobkins Preschool was registered in 1995. The nursery employs four members of

childcare staff. Of these, three staff hold appropriate early years qualifications at level 3

and the manager has qualified teacher status. The pre-school opens from Monday to

Friday term time only. Sessions are from 8.45am until 11.45am and 12.15pm until

3.15pm. A breakfast club operates from 8.15am until 8.45am and a lunch club operates

from 11.45am until 12.15pm. The pre-school provides funded early education for two-,

three- and four-year-old children.

This inspection was carried out by Ofsted under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act

2006 on the quality and standards of provision that is registered on the Early Years

Register. The registered person must ensure that this provision complies with the

statutory framework for children’s learning, development and care, known as the early

years foundation stage.

Any complaints about the inspection or the report should be made following the

procedures set out in the guidance ‘Complaints procedure: raising concerns and making

complaints about Ofsted’, which is available from Ofsted’s website:

www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted. If you would like Ofsted to send you a

copy of the guidance, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.

Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins Preschool, 26 March 2018 5 of 5

The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects to

achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all

ages. It regulates and inspects childcare and children's social care, and inspects the Children and Family

Court Advisory Support Service (Cafcass), schools, colleges, initial teacher training, work-based learning and

skills training, adult and community learning, and education and training in prisons and other secure

establishments. It assesses council children’s services, and inspects services for looked after children,

safeguarding and child protection.

If you would like a copy of this document in a different format, such as large print or Braille,

please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.

You may reuse this information (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium,

under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/, write to the Information Policy

Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email:

psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

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© Crown copyright 2018Please find below a copy of our Ofsted report from 2014 or click on the link to read from the Ofsted website. http://reports.ofsted.gov.uk/provider/files/2433633/urn/304986.pdf



2014 report

Bosley Bobkins

St Mary's C of E School, Leek Road, Bosley, Macclesfield, SK11 0NX

Inspection date 16/10/2014

Previous inspection date 08/07/2009

The quality and standards of the early years provision

This inspection: 2

Previous inspection: 2

How well the early years provision meets the needs of the range of children who

attend  2

The contribution of the early years provision to the well-being of children 2

The effectiveness of the leadership and management of the early years provision 2

The quality and standards of the early years provision  This provision is good


 Parents feel informed about their children's progress and well-being. Practitioners

provide parents with ideas to continue their children's learning at home, which

successfully contributes to the good progress children make.

 Practitioners implement robust safeguarding and child protection procedures, which

ensure children are safe within the nursery. For example, adults deployed in the

outdoor play area ensure they have sight of all of the children at all times.

 Partnerships with other professionals are active and effective. As a result, children with

special educational needs and/or disabilities make very good progress in their learning.

 The key-person system is well established. As a result, children feel secure and arrive

happy and ready to take part in activities with confidence.


It is not yet outstanding because

 On occasions, the organisation of activities means that some children have fewer

opportunities to concentrate for increasing periods.

 The manager does not always fully link her observations of teaching to sharply focused

performance targets for individual practitioners, in order to promote an even higher

quality of teaching.Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 2 of 10

Information about this inspection

Inspections of registered early years provision are:

 scheduled at least once in every inspection cycle – the current cycle ends on 31 July

2016

 scheduled more frequently where Ofsted identifies a need to do so, for example

where provision was previously judged inadequate

 brought forward in the inspection cycle where Ofsted has received information that

suggests the provision may not be meeting the legal requirements of the Early Years

Foundation Stage or where assessment of the provision identifies a need for early

inspection

 prioritised where we have received information that the provision is not meeting the

requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage and which suggests children may

not be safe

 scheduled at the completion of an investigation into failure to comply with the

requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage.

The provision is also registered on the voluntary and compulsory parts of the Childcare

Register. This report includes a judgment about compliance with the requirements of that

register.

Inspection activities

 The inspector observed activities in the building used by the pre-school.

 The inspector met with the manager.

 The inspector conducted a joint observation with the manager.

The inspector looked at a range of documents including those used for assessment,

planning and observation.

The inspector checked evidence of the suitability and qualifications of members of

the committee and all practitioners working with children.

 The inspector took account of the views of parents spoken to on the day.

Inspector

Susan KingInspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 3 of 10

Full report

Information about the setting

Bosley Bobkins Pre-school opened in 1995 and is registered on the Early Years Register

and the compulsory and voluntary parts of the Childcare Register. The pre-school is

managed by a voluntary committee. It operates within the grounds of St Mary's CE School

in Bosley, near Macclesfield, Cheshire. The pre-school serves the immediate locality and

also the surrounding areas. It opens five days a week from 8.45am until 11.45am and

12.15pm until 3.15pm. A breakfast club is open from 8.15am until 8.45am and a lunch

club is open from 11.45am until 12.15pm. Children attend for a variety of sessions. All

sessions are term time only. Children are cared for in one room and have access to

extensive outdoor play areas. There are currently 23 children in the early years age range.

The pre-school receives funding for the provision of free early education for two-, threeand

four-year-old children. The pre-school supports children with special educational

needs and/or disabilities. There are currently five staff working directly with the children,

all of whom have an appropriate early years qualification. The manager has Qualified

Teacher Status. The pre-school receives support from the local authority. It is a member

of the Pre-school Learning Alliance.

What the setting needs to do to improve further

To further improve the quality of the early years provision the provider should:

 extend opportunities for all children to concentrate for increasing periods, for

example, by reviewing the organisation of activities across the day so that children

can extend their self-initiated play alongside adult-led activities

 focus the manager's observations of staff practice more precisely, so that an even

higher quality of teaching is promoted.

Inspection judgements

How well the early years provision meets the needs of the range of children

who attend

Teaching is good in this pre-school and, therefore, children make good progress.

Practitioners demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the learning and development

requirements when they plan the educational programme. For example, children find their

name cards on arrival at pre-school and again when they sit down for snack time. As a

result, children begin learning to read familiar words as part of well-planned and familiar

routines. Furthermore, children learn that writing carries meaning because practitioners

write down what children say and read it back to them. For example, the children help to

suggest ideas for activities, when they plan the holiday theme which has arisen from

children's interests. They later refer back to this written plan and remember their ideas.

Practitioners understand how children learn and usually plan a balance of activities that Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 4 of 10

fully promote the characteristics of effective learning. However, on occasion, adult-led

activities are continued for too long and as a consequence, some children lose

concentration.

Practitioners know the children well. They work together to complete observations of

children's learning. The observations are used to plan relevant next steps for children's

learning, so that children make best progress. Practitioners summarise children's

achievements every half term and share the report with parents. This ensures that any

emerging concerns about children's learning and development are addressed quickly. In

addition, the manager groups children who are at a similar stage in their learning and

development for some of the activities. As a result, teaching is well targeted and planned

experiences are challenging. Children develop the key skills that they need when they

move to school. For example, at register time, their communication and language is

promoted because they learn to listen and speak in a group.

Partnerships with parents are strong. Practitioners involve parents in all assessments of

their children's progress. This includes an assessment of their starting points when they

arrive at pre-school. Consequently, parents report that they feel informed about their

children's learning. Good systems are in place to support parents to continue their

children's learning at home. For example, children borrow story packs to take home to

share with their families. Children also like to borrow the pre-school's toy dog, who always

brings her own 'talk and listen' den with her. Children with special educational needs

and/or disabilities make very good progress. This is because partnerships with other

professionals are active and effective.

The contribution of the early years provision to the well-being of children

The key-person system is well established in the pre-school. Parents report that they feel

supported by practitioners. These very positive relationships ensure that children feel

secure and settle quickly into their play when they arrive at the pre-school each day.

Practitioners are good role models and set clear boundaries for children's behaviour.

Routines are well established, so children know what to do. For example, the sound made

by a small hand bell signals that children must stop what they are doing. When children

have stopped playing they listen to what practitioners want them to do next.

Familiar routines foster children's confidence and self-esteem and, subsequently, children

are emotionally ready to start school. For example, each day one child is named as the

special helper. Their name is written prominently on the white board, so everyone in the

pre-school knows who the helper is today. The helper has a number of important tasks.

These include ringing the 'stop and listen' bell, counting the children at register time and

giving out the snack. At snack time, children learn to make healthy choices when they eat

and drink because practitioners discuss different types of food with them. Children have

good opportunities to exercise in the fresh air at this rural pre-school. They can climb and

run energetically on safe equipment and surfaces. Children begin to understand that they

get out of breath when they exercise. Practitioners support children to become

independent in their self-care. Children learn to wash their hands before they eat and they

know that this stops germs that give them tummy ache, getting onto their food. Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 5 of 10

Resources for play and learning are of good quality and are well maintained. The room is

arranged so that all toys are visible to the children. Consequently, children have

opportunities to make independent choices in their play. Risk is minimised so that children

can play and learn safely. For example, sensible and simple risk assessments are in place

for activities, such as sand play. As a result, children learn to keep themselves and others

safe when they play in the sand. All practitioners are first-aid trained and, therefore, they

know how to respond to accidents and injuries to children.

The effectiveness of the leadership and management of the early years

provision

Leadership provided by the manager and the voluntary committee is good. The

practitioners work well together as a team. They demonstrate high expectations of

themselves and are ambitious for the children they care for. Practitioners understand and

implement the safeguarding and welfare requirements. Suitable priority is given to

ensuring that everyone is trained in child protection. As a result, practitioners know the

action they must take if they have concerns about the welfare of children. Recruitment

practice is robust. All new employees and committee members have undergone a

Disclosure and Barring Service check. Induction training is provided so that practitioners

understand their roles and responsibilities.

The manager monitors the educational programme and tracks the progress and

development of the children. This ensures that the assessment of children's progress is

accurate and any concerns about their progress and development are identified and

addressed quickly. The manager works alongside practitioners for most of the time. She

provides guidance that enables practitioners to enhance the quality of their teaching. In

addition, the manager has established regular and supportive supervision meetings, where

matters of performance are considered. However, targets for individual practitioners

identified at supervision meetings are not always closely linked to observations of their

teaching. As a result, practitioners do not yet have specific and measurable targets for

further enhancing their teaching. Everyone in the team attends training in order to

continually improve their knowledge and skills. The impact on practice of training is

evaluated. For example, practitioners who attended training about communication and

language show the changes they have made to the learning environment. They describe

how the changes promote children's emotional well-being and support them as they learn

to speak and listen.

The voluntary committee and the manager work effectively together to evaluate and

continuously improve the pre-school. Parents and other partners are routinely consulted

and the views of practitioners and children are sought. Priorities for improvement,

identified through self-evaluation, are practical and achievable. Partnerships with parents

are effective and support children's learning at home. Partnership work between the

school and the pre-school includes regular meetings to share information. In addition,

practitioners in the pre-school and in the school's foundation stage create opportunities for

their children to visit each other for activities and celebrations. This enriches the

experience of all of the children and supports the pre-school children when they move to Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 6 of 10

school. There are good working partnerships with other professionals and, therefore, the

well-being and good progress of children with special educational needs and/or disabilities

is ensured.

The Childcare Register

The requirements for the compulsory part of the Childcare Register are Met

The requirements for the voluntary part of the Childcare Register are MetInspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 7 of 10

What inspection judgements mean

Registered early years provision

Grade Judgement Description

Grade 1 Outstanding Outstanding provision is highly effective in meeting the needs

of all children exceptionally well. This ensures that children are

very well prepared for the next stage of their learning.

Grade 2 Good Good provision is effective in delivering provision that meets

the needs of all children well. This ensures children are ready

for the next stage of their learning.

Grade 3 Requires

improvement

The provision is not giving children a good standard of early

years education and/or there are minor breaches of the

safeguarding and welfare requirements of the Early Years

Foundation Stage. We re-inspect nurseries and pre-schools

judged as requires improvement within 12 months of the date

of inspection.

Grade 4 Inadequate Provision that is inadequate requires significant improvement

and/or enforcement action. The provision is failing to give

children an acceptable standard of early years education and/or

is not meeting the safeguarding and welfare requirements of

the Early Years Foundation Stage. It will be monitored and

inspected again within six months of the date of this inspection.

Met There were no children present at the time of the inspection.

The inspection judgement is that the provider continues to

meet the requirements for registration.

Not met There were no children present at the time of the inspection.

The inspection judgement is that the provider does not meet

the requirements for registration. Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 8 of 10

Inspection

This inspection was carried out by Ofsted under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act

2006 on the quality and standards of provision that is registered on the Early Years

Register. The registered person must ensure that this provision complies with the

statutory framework for children’s learning, development and care, known as the Early

Years Foundation Stage.

Setting details

Unique reference number 304986

Local authority Cheshire East

Inspection number 867559

Type of provision

Registration category Childcare - Non-Domestic

Age range of children 0 - 17

Total number of places 16

Number of children on roll 23

Name of provider Bosley Bobkins Playgroup Committee

Date of previous inspection 08/07/2009

Telephone number 01260 223280

Any complaints about the inspection or the report should be made following the procedures

set out in the guidance ‘Complaints procedure: raising concerns and making complaints

about Ofsted’, which is available from Ofsted’s website: www.ofsted.gov.uk. If you would

like Ofsted to send you a copy of the guidance, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email

enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.

Type of provision

For the purposes of this inspection the following definitions apply:

Full-time provision is that which operates for more than three hours. These are usually

known as nurseries, nursery schools and pre-schools and must deliver the Early Years

Foundation Stage. They are registered on the Early Years Register and pay the higher fee

for registration.

Sessional provision operates for more than two hours but does not exceed three hours in

any one day. These are usually known as pre-schools, kindergartens or nursery schools Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 9 of 10

and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage. They are registered on the Early Years

Register and pay the lower fee for registration.

Childminders care for one or more children where individual children attend for a period of

more than two hours in any one day. They operate from domestic premises, which are

usually the childminder’s own home. They are registered on the Early Years Register and

must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage.

Out of school provision may be sessional or full-time provision and is delivered before or

after school and/or in the summer holidays. They are registered on the Early Years

Register and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage. Where children receive their

Early Years Foundation Stage in school these providers do not have to deliver the learning

and development requirements in full but should complement the experiences children

receive in school.Inspection report: Bosley Bobkins, 16/10/2014 10 of 10

The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects to

achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all

ages. It regulates and inspects childcare and children's social care, and inspects the Children and Family

Court Advisory Support Service (Cafcass), schools, colleges, initial teacher training, work-based learning and

skills training, adult and community learning, and education and training in prisons and other secure

establishments. It assesses council children’s services, and inspects services for looked after children,

safeguarding and child protection.

If you would like a copy of this document in a different format, such as large print or Braille,

please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.

You may copy all or parts of this document for non-commercial educational purposes, as long

as you give details of the source and date of publication and do not alter the information in any

way.

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inspection reports, please visit our website and go to ‘Subscribe’.

Piccadilly Gate

Store St

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M1 2WD

T: 0300 123 4234

Textphone: 0161 618 8524

E: enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk

W: www.ofsted.gov.uk

© Crown copyright 2012